What is a DMARC Policy?

Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting, and Conformance, also known as DMARC, is a widely popular email authentication protocol that takes email security to new heights. The specialty of DMARC is that it bestows upon domain owners the ability to protect their domain from unauthorized use and abuse by cybercriminals, as in the case of email spoofing. An enforced DMARC policy in your organization can help mitigate Business Email Compromise, phishing scams, and other cyber threats that revolve around email security and domain abuse.

For DMARC to be implemented in your organization, the DMARC DNS entry needs to be published and stored in the DNS. As soon as the DMARC entry is published, any receiving email server can authenticate the incoming emails as per the instructions defined by the domain owner within the DNS entry. Only if the email passes the authentication it will be delivered to the receiver’s inbox, however, if the email fails authentication, depending on the DMARC policy it would be either delivered, quarantined, or rejected.